Malawi

 

Egypt

Mozambique

Malawi

Namibia

Mauritius

United Kingdom

Zanzibar

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Egypt
The Red Sea, incredibly clear water, drop-offs to 800 feet and a natures palette of underwater colors make this one of the top dive locations in the world. Throw in some big underwater life, like sharks, mantas and more, some world famous wrecks for a real treat and a vacation you will not forget. Offsetting the lively underwater realm is the starkness of the desert shorelines and mountains.

The Red Sea is an excellent place to learn to dive and no one can teach you more than Sinai Divers. Not only are certification classes available in diving but also underwater photography including still and video are offered.

Here you will join the likes of Jacques Cousteau and Hans Hass who made scuba diving history exploring both the virgin wonders of recreational diving and one of the most fascinating coral reef systems in the world.

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Mozambique
The best dive spots in Mozambique is ponta d’Ouro - which is a 20 min. drive from S.A border, Bazaruto Island and Inhaca Island. A tropical paradise of palm trees and white sand beaches awaits the visitor to this enchanting country. Friendly locals, exquisite Portuguese styled seafood and clear – warm waters makes Mozambique a unique dive destination.

Diving is good all year round but shark diving in Mozambique is best from October to March and Whale Shark diving December to February. All diving is on reefs within comfortable reach of the launch site. Depths range from 10 to 40 metres. Visibility varying from 10 to 50 metres in the summer with little to no current and good surface conditions.The reefs are varied with a profusion of soft corals.

The coast is littered with hundreds of wrecks, including sixteenth-century Portuguese galleons so wreck diving must do speciality

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Malawi
Lake Malawi is a World Heritage Site, the first fresh-water marine reserve on earth, and a place of stunning natural beauty. With spectacular sunrises, unspoiled scenery and crystal clear waters; Lake Malawi is one of the most famous freshwater scuba diving locations in the world.The third largest lake in Africa, ninth worldwide and with a depth of up to 700 metres.

Lake Malawi boasts of over 1000 species of tropical fish - 350 of which are unique to the lake. Scuba diving in Lake Malawi is like exploring a giant aquarium and being engulfed by a rainbow of fish.

Lake Malawi is a great place to SCUBA dive, ideally suited to beginners or those who prefer relaxed diving with no dangers.

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Mauritius
Mauritius lies in the Indian Ocean, roughly 800km (500mi) east of Madagascar. If you imagine a tropical paradise with iridescent beaches and excellent diving - in Mauritius your fantasy will come true.

The island is surrounded by a coral fringing reef system with a diversity of marine life and divers can come face to face with pelagics like barracudas, eagle rays and sharks. Other encounters on the dive sites could be molluscs, turtles and an innumerable amount fish. Dolphins and four types of whale are frequently spotted on the surface.

Around the island, the reef breaks in several places. The largest break is along the black cliffs between Souillac and Le Bouchon on the southern coast and at Flic en Flac on the West Coast.

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Namibia
Namibia offers divers two spectacular spectacular sinkholes. They are Otjikoto and Lake Guinas, both of which are deep and at altitude. Lake Otjikoto has an underwater museum of sorts as the Germans dumped vast quantities of ammunition, including large guns. Namibia also has extraordinary subterranean lakes including the largest known underground lake in the world called the Dragon’s Breath cave. Diving in Namibia’s extraordinary subterranean lakes, however should be attempted only by highly experienced divers.

Scuba diving off Namibia’s coast also presents a daunting challenge, as sea temperatures vary from 9 centigrade to 7 centigrade and visibility is often as little as half a metre, at best not more than three meters. From December to May, between Spencer Bay and Luderitz, the visibility is between 3 m and 10 m, and shipwrecks makes diving there a special experience. North of Spencer Bay the visibility is mostly half a meter.

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United Kingdom
Mauritius lies in the Indian Ocean, roughly 800km (500mi) east of Madagascar. If you imagine a tropical paradise with iridescent beaches and excellent diving - in Mauritius your fantasy will come true.

The island is surrounded by a coral fringing reef system with a diversity of marine life and divers can come face to face with pelagics like barracudas, eagle rays and sharks. Other encounters on the dive sites could be molluscs, turtles and an innumerable amount fish. Dolphins and four types of whale are frequently spotted on the surface.

Around the island, the reef breaks in several places. The largest break is along the black cliffs between Souillac and Le Bouchon on the southern coast and at Flic en Flac on the West Coast. .

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Zanzibar
Arabia meets Africa on this once slave trade centre. Very evident of this is the mixture of people found on the island. Sultans from Oman made Zanzibar there capital, and many old palaces in and around Stone town give testament to this.

Diving in the flat seas around Zanzibar is simply spectacular; the viz. is an average of 25 metres and teeming with marine life and coral. We dived around little islands situated 2 km offshore from Stone Town and are still to this day the best I have dived. On the northern tip of Zanzibar is Nungwi, recognized as the best dive spot on the island, with numerous reefs off a relatively uninhabited coastline.

Dive sites include an incredible wall dive descending to 35m, Leven Banks , a massive reef structure 7 miles out to sea where depths vary from 14m at the shallowest point to a +200m on the ocean bed

Egypt

Mozambique

Malawi

Namibia

Mauritius

United Kingdom

Zanzibar